Jewellery in Food – What’s the Point?

Ever since a blogger posted a link to his article regarding the 5 Most Expensive Desserts Around the World on our Facebook page, my eyes have been opened to something I regard to be one of the most pointless presentation devices in food to date. Putting jewellery in the food.

Strawberries Arnaud, complete with a pink diamond ring

Strawberries Arnaud, complete with a pink diamond ring

Of course food like this is only ever consumed by the super-rich multi-billionaire clientèle of the super-rich multi-billion-pound establishments. People with more money than they know what to do with. The aforementioned blog post reveals dishes containing aquamarine stones, to 24 carats of edible gold leaf, all the way to a wine-soaked strawberry dish (named Strawberries Arnaud) with a pink diamond ring (see pictured) in amongst it.

Mixed Berry Mousse

Mixed Berry Mousse as served at The Tea Room at Harrods, which comes decorated with a little edible gold leaf.

Gold leaf, like that used on this Mixed Berry Mousse from Harrods (see pictured) is a different story because it’s edible, and therefore has some bearing on the dish itself. I personally don’t see the point in buying a dish of strawberries and cream that you could quite happily buy from Sainsburys at a largely-slashed price for the sake of getting a diamond ring. Why not just go to the jewellers – it really does not add anything to the eating experience, which is the whole purpose of food to begin with, I think!

Rudolph the Ruby-Nosed Reindeer Tarts - priced at £475 each as shown on Channel 4's The World's Most Expensive Christmas. Image from Twitter

Rudolph the Ruby-Nosed Reindeer Tarts – priced at £475 each as shown on Channel 4’s The World’s Most Expensive Christmas.
Image from Twitter

To end on a kind of cute, but no less ridiculous note, the Channel 4 documentary Most Expensive Christmas alerted me even further to jewellery’s impact in food. These £475-per-piece Rudolph the Ruby-Nosed Reindeer Tarts(see pictured) for example. A real ruby for the nose, which the consumer obviously gets to keep. The Daily Mail joked that was unless the consumer unwittingly ate it first. Again, I ask, what’s the point? Have the ruby made into a pendant, I suppose? But why buy the tart if the ruby is what you’re buying it for?

I don’t know – it just astounds me.

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